We know Bald Eagles hang around the SWLA area. Each year more and more migrate to the area and build nests along the marshes and rivers. I have seen quite a few pictures of them nesting in Pine trees up towards DeRidder and DeQuincy. Personally, I have not seen one in the area, but have had the chance to see a few while traveling towards Florida.

Hallie and Katie Maddox
Hallie and Katie Maddox
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It seems like Katie and Hallie Maddox got quite the show the other day while driving down Pete Seay Road in Sulphur. In front of them on the road was a squirrel. Now, I am not too sure if the squirrel was dead or alive, but the Eagle that swooped down to grab it off of the road didn't seem to care either way.

Hallie and Katie Maddox
Hallie and Katie Maddox
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As the ladies were driving, It flew down, grabbed the squirrel, and flew right back up to a tree nearby. The girls got pictures of it in motion and then followed by eating its new little snack in the tree. Eagles are considered opportunistic predators. They eat a wide range of food: waterfowl, squirrels, raccoons, rabbits, fish, and other birds. Essentially the world is the Eagle's all-you-can-eat buffet. They have been also known to scavenge as well. Although they have been known to kill animals larger than they are, they rely heavily on being able to grab their prey up and then carry it up to safety in a tree. Their carrying capacity on average is about four pounds. So if you're worried about your dog or cat being carried away, just make sure they're more than at least found pounds!

Hallie and Katie Maddox
Hallie and Katie Maddox
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Although the squirrel was not so lucky that day, we are all lucky that Katie and Hallie were able to snap some pictures of this amazing bird-catching lunch for the afternoon!

 

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