Think about the energy bill that you pay to moderate the temperature inside your home. Think about how much money you spend just to make the temperature in the living room two degrees cooler or two degrees warmer. Now, imagine the amount of energy needed to drop the temperatures of "all of outdoors" by 15 to 20 degrees over the course of six hours.

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That's kind of what we are expecting from Mother Nature today. The ol' girl is slipping another November cold front through Louisiana as we speak. On the eastern side of the front, where we are at the time of this report, conditions are almost springlike. But by lunchtime today many of us could be clamouring about the truck looking for that jacket we put in there last weekend.

Forecasters with the National Weather Service anticipate the cold front will pass through much of South Louisiana by mid-morning today. Behind the front, the winds will pick up in velocity from the north. In other words, it's going to be a cold wind blowing while temperatures are plummeting after lunch.

Rob Perillo/KATC

The Weather Service forecast and the forecast models used by the Storm Team Three Weather Lab at KATC are in agreement that by 10 this morning most of us along I-10 will be beginning the transition from comfortable weather to winter chills.

Forecasters are suggesting that temperatures could reach into the upper 60s or low 70s before the front pushes through. However, by quitting time this afternoon most temperature readings in the area will have fallen into the upper 50s. They should continue to drop to an overnight low of 46 degrees.

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The wind will be the issue you complain the most about. Forecasters say wind gusts in excess of 25 mph will be common this afternoon. The winds will continue to gust in the overnight hours but will finally lay down a bit by Friday.

The outlook for the weekend is wonderful with clear skies and seasonable temperatures forecast for both Saturday and Sunday. But in the meantime, don't forget your coat.

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