Here's where I peacock a little and say "I told you so" to so many people. Many months after Hurricane Laura, I started following the saga that is the Capital One building. Lord, the rumors were thick about its fate. Most of them were dooming it from the start saying it was structurally unsound and that it was being torn down according to someone's uncle's friend's cousin.

The actual story is much like the rest of the home and business owners trying to recover in the Lake Area, insurance. Hertz Financial Group, like most of us around here, has been fighting and fighting for their insurance company to make good on their insurance policy. According to the court files, Case 2:2621cv00482 began in February of 2021. Since then, it has moved around and been delayed numerous times.

Garrett Manuel
Garrett Manuel
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KPLC was able to get some information from the owner of the building back in April of this year. According to their report, the Hertz Group finally made a statement saying they were going to start their first phase of the repair. That phase is to include repairs to the freight elevator, roof, and skywalk. This phase will also begin the huge task of replacing the iconic glass that is mostly plywood currently.

At least we will finally see progress on the building that is so iconic to the Lake Charles skyline. I don't think I have ever been so excited to see one of those little construction signs out in front of a building in my life.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.