Finally, some news we can all rejoice about! The rumors about the Capital One building in downtown Lake Charles are just all over the place. I have read so many random rumors that even I can't keep up with what is real anymore!

The main rumor is that the structure was ruined and that it was being torn down. Then there were a few that some big investor bought and was going to turn it into housing. Another said that it was just going to sit and sit until someone actually bought it. Every time I would read the rumors and roll my eyes, a little part of me started to believe it! Luckily, KPLC did some leg work so that I didn't have to!

The latest information, according to KPLC talking to the Hertz Group, is that the building isn't going anywhere. A statement to KPLC from the group stated that, like everyone in the area, they are still fighting their insurance provider in court. They have gone through the process of even meeting in mediation, but nothing really came of it in the end. Despite the ongoing court issues, the group is beginning to move forward in repairing the building including the iconic windows we all bought pieces of after Hurricane Laura.

Capital One Building
Hibernia Tower in Lake Charles after Hurricane Rita (Now the Capital One Building) -- Getty Images
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The first phase, according to the statement given to KPLC, is that it will include the windows, roof, skywalk repair, and repairing the freight elevator. The window and skywalk repair will make the outside of the building look much better instead of the eyesore of broken, missing, and boarded-up windows we have become accustomed to for almost two years now.

As the repairs begin on the building, the newest court case for the group versus their insurance company has been set for June 20, 2022. It has been moved around before, so we will see if that date holds true. On the upside, we can breathe a bit of relief knowing that the building will finally begin to get back to normal and we won't lose a stapel of the iconic Lake Charles skyline.

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