Now that we are in the winter months unfortunately COVID-19 cases rising across the nation. Due to the high rate of cases, sometimes no matter how safe you are trying to be there are times you will come in contact with someone who tested positive. By now, we've all got the call "Hey, I just wanted you to know I tested positive," or "Hey, I just wanted to let you know I was with someone that just tested positive." That being said, you may not have time to go get tested or a testing site may not be open, but you know you need to get tested as soon as possible for your safety and that of others.

Good news! All U.S. households can now go online and order 1 set of (4) free COVID-19 at-home tests straight from the United States Postal Service (USPS). Please note, only one order per household/residential address. One order includes (4) individual rapid antigen at-home COVID-19 tests and results are available in 15 minutes. All you have to do is go to USPS.com to get your free at-home tests. Orders will begin shipping from local USPS locations in late January.

Things to know about this test

1.) It is suitable for people 4 years old and up.

2.) An adult should perform the sample collection on people ages 4-14.

3.) This is not a PCR or Molecular test.

4.) If you need a test for travel, concerts, sporting event, etc. make sure you check with the cruise line, airline, destination country, or venue as they may require specific testing.

Seek Medical Attention - if you are having symptoms like a fever over  102°F for longer than 48 hours, a persistent low-grade fever, shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, blue lips or face, dizziness, slurred speech or seizures, coughing up blood, severe coughing spells, coughing up blood, lightheadedness, feeling too weak to stand, feeling very tired or lethargic, persistent vomiting or diarrhea, or feeling not well enough to stay home.

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.