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It's a little less than two weeks off. Daylight Saving Time will officially end on Sunday, November 1 at 2:00 am. So, here we go again. We will have to change every clock in the house and most of us still don't understand why we continue to do this twice every year.

According to the website, standardtime.com,

Daylight saving time did indeed begin in the United States during World War I, primarily to save fuel by reducing the need to use artificial lighting. Although some states and communities observed daylight saving time between the wars, it was not observed nationally again until World War II.

Of course, World War II is long over. So why do we still observe daylight saving time?

It's a great question. Why are we still doing this? There is a huge faction growing in the country that would have us stay on Daylight Saving Time permanently. In fact, a number of states, including Louisiana, have passed legislation to do so, but most all await the Federal government to take the initiative to make Daylight Saving Time the standard for the country.

According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, making the clock changes is even unhealthy for us:

About half-a-dozen studies have found a 5% to 15% increased risk of having a heart attack during the days after shifting to daylight-saving time.

Even President Trump says he's all for the idea, but apparently the idea has yet to reach the right people to make it happen.

I understand why the idea was adopted during the early 1900's, but those days are long gone; like one hundred years long gone.

Is there some specific reason that lawmakers have yet to disclose that could justify the twice annual clock changes? If so, I sure wish they would lay out those reasons for all of us to see and understand.

Until that day comes, our bodies will just have to continue to make the adjustments every Spring and Fall.

Just remember, time falls back in the fall. So Halloween night, October 31, before you go to bed, set your clock BACK ONE HOUR and you’ll be good to go Sunday morning.